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New car smell: Improved identification of odours in vehicle interior air

Introduction

VIAQ has been a topic of interest since the late 1970s, when concern over the effect of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs) on the indoor environment began to be replicated in the automotive industry.

The release of VOCs and SVOCs from vehicle trim materials (including plastics, polyurethane, foam, wood, carpets, textiles and adhesives) is the major factor causing poor VIAQ, and the consequent negative effect on health is the primary driver for regulations in this area. Additional concerns relate to consumers’ dislike of off-odours in vehicle cabins, which has risen to be the most complained-about quality issue in China.[1]

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