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Fields & Applications Chemical

Sound Dilutions

The Problem

Significant systemic errors in high-throughput screening of compounds (HTS) are generated by the use of pipettes and serial dilution processes. These errors, which include high rates of both false positive and false negative results, can mislead researchers on which compounds will make the best drug candidates and misdirect the development of subsequent compounds. The problem is widespread and deeply entrenched.

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About the Authors

Joe Olechno

Joe Olechno, Senior Research Fellow at Labcyte, has spent the last 30 years working on the development of innovative scientific tools and evangelizing those tools to a broad scientific field. He has published on numerous topics from gas chromatography and capillary electrophoresis to plant, insect and mammalian biochemistry, proteomics and glycomics. Most recently, he has focused on expanding the applications and use of acoustic liquid handling. He likes the idea of telling a liquid when to jump and how high. His PhD is from the University of California at Davis in Biochemistry.


Sean Ekins

"Doing all your science in or on a computer was not even a dream I had as a kid. Since the late 90's I have done all my science with models and through collaborations with others to get the data. One side effect of this is a complete lack of interest in computer games", says Sean Ekins. "I also did not imagine those computer models would be so susceptible to data quality issues and be put to use in helping to diagnose dispensing method differences." He has an underlying interest in repurposing pretty much everything, including the software and chemistry apps he uses.


Antony Williams

Antony Williams is the VP of Strategic Development for the Royal Society of Chemistry and manager of the eScience team. At the RSC he is involved with a number of national and international projects for delivering chemistry related data to the community. He is one of the original founders of the ChemSpider project, one of the world’s top online chemistry databases. He has a PhD from the University of London and has worked in academia, for government research labs, in start-up companies and in Fortune 500 companies. He is widely published with over 150 publications and book chapters and is known as the ChemConnector in the social networks. He is a winner of the Jim Gray award for eScience from Microsoft.

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