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Fields & Applications Environmental, Food, Beverage & Agriculture, Chemical

The Value of a Pragmatic Approach

People typically expect (or assume) that products that come into contact with their bodies (food, cosmetics, and so on) are free from potential health risks. To that end, international organizations study potentially toxic compounds and set limits of acceptability that industries and control organizations have to monitor. However, many foods and cosmetics include complex mixtures of natural products – so toxic compounds are typically present at trace levels, hiding amongst hundreds of other molecules. To detect trace toxins, analytical chemists must pay careful attention to both recovery and separation. Moreover, when developing a method, we must remember that many companies producing food and natural products do not have access to complex and expensive instrumentation – and high throughput (to control production) tops the list of priorities.

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About the Author

Cecilia Cagliero

Cecilia Cagliero is Assistant Professor in Pharmaceutical Biology at the Department of Drug Science and Technology of University of Turin (Italy). She received the PhD in Science and High Technology at the University of Turin in February 2010. In 2016 she was selected for a Mobility Grant from the University of Turin and she spent it at Iowa State University (USA). The research of Dr. Cagliero is primarily focused towards the development of new approaches for the definition of the composition of volatile and nonvolatile biologically active secondary metabolites of plants and plant products of interest in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food fields. In 2016, she was awarded with the "Leslie S. Ettre Award” for her presentation on the measurement of acrylamide in coffee powders using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).

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