Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Business & Education Professional Development

Credit Where Credit’s Due

Under what circumstances should it be deemed legitimate to accept, or moreover to expect, authorship of an academic paper? The question has troubled me from time to time in my research career. The desire to publish is a prerequisite to a successful career for any student, researcher, principal investigator (PI) or professor. But to publish at any cost? Hopefully not. In today’s highly competitive funding climate, the doctrine of “publish or perish” resonates more than ever with academics. Published papers and impact factors are the currency of research groups, and this is particularly applicable to postdoctoral researchers. For a postdoc, times are tough. Contract lengths of three years or less are standard practice, and in this snapshot period of their career, it is essential they publish (preferably as first-named or corresponding author) to demonstrate their capability and productivity to future employers.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Analytical Scientist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

John Griffiths

John is a scientist with over 30 years’ experience in analytical chemistry. He began his working life at the age of 19 in a small laboratory sited on Loughborough Sewage Works where sample matrices were often challenging and frequently malodourous (“Sludge” being his least favourite matrix to test.) Leaving the world of environmental analysis after 12 years, John took a Master’s Degree (Loughborough University) followed by a PhD in Analytical Science (Nottingham Trent University), which ultimately led him to research positions in the less pungent world of academia. For around the next 13 years he worked in proteomics using nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. It was during this time, at both The University of Manchester and The Cancer Research Institute that he published some 30-odd papers and book chapters, as well as recently editing a rather catchy-titled book on proteomics, “Analysis of Protein Post-Translational Modifications by Mass Spectrometry”. Experience predominantly gained here provided the backdrop to the “In my view” article here. John is currently engaged as a Senior Analyst at Hall Analytical Laboratories in Manchester where he works on mass spectrometry data interpretation on data generated in the analysis of Extractables and Leachables. These are typically conducted on single-use medical devices such as filters, syringes, inhaler components etc. John is a Chartered Chemist, Chartered Scientist and Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry as well as being a member of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, the Chromatographic Society and the British Mass Spectrometry Society of which he is a Co-opted board member.

Newsletter

Send me the latest from The Analytical Scientist.

Sign up now

Most Popular

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register