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Fields & Applications Gas Chromatography, Chemical

99 Dead Balloons

Shortage of natural resources is sadly not a new phenomenon. As we continue down our path of development (a word disputed by sustainability-minded individuals), increasing demand fast outstrips supply. Continually rising oil prices are an obvious testament to that fact. Likewise, the precious metals used in the technology sector have followed a similar trend, and recycling – of computers, mobile phones, and other gadgets – has found new favor given the small but valuable amounts of gold, iridium, and silver that can be “mined”, often by enterprising Asian companies. According to a 2008 study by Japanese recycling firm Yokohama Metal Co Ltd., a tonne of gold mine ore yields 5 grams of gold on average – small fry compared with the 150 gram yield from a tonne of discarded mobile phones (1). No wonder electronics firms are keen to offer free recycling services so readily…

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About the Author

Rich Whitworth

Rich Whitworth completed his studies in medical biochemistry at the University of Leicester, UK, in 1998. To cut a long story short, he escaped to Tokyo to spend five years working for the largest English language publisher in Japan. "Carving out a career in the megalopolis that is Tokyo changed my outlook forever. When seeing life through such a kaleidoscopic lens, it's hard not to get truly caught up in the moment." On returning to the UK, after a few false starts with grey, corporate publishers, Rich was snapped up by Texere Publishing, where he spearheaded the editorial development of The Analytical Scientist. "I feel honored to be part of the close-knit team that forged The Analytical Scientist – we've created a very fresh and forward-thinking publication." Rich is now also Content Director of Texere Publishing, the company behind The Analytical Scientist.

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