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Elizabeth N. Treher

Picture of Author Elizabeth N. Treher
Elizabeth N. Treher

Elizabeth Treher is the founder of several entrepreneurial organizations and was an invited member of the first U.S. delegation to China for Education and Training. Trained as a radiochemist, she led multinational chemistry projects in industry, government, and academia, and the start up of a corporate university serving 22,000 global employees. A graduate of Washington University in St. Louis with an M.A. and Ph.D. in nuclear and radiochemistry, Liz also attended Northwestern University and was a NSF Postdoctoral Fellow. She has more than 85 publications and patents. Wiley & Sons published her most recent book for technical managers. 

Fields & Applications Clinical

Confronting Conflict

Do you leave work with a knot in the pit of your stomach, worrying about interpersonal conflict between staff members in your lab? Do you get caught between staff members and flounder, not sure whether to intervene or ignore the situation? Do you tend to see the positive side of conflict or does the mere thought of tackling a problem make you want to call in sick?

Conflict can arise from many sources in organizations. You may face ‘internal conflict’ between responsibilities of your work and family, or other personal demands. As a manager, you may experience ‘interpersonal conflict’ between two of your staff, or ‘hierarchical conflict’ between you and a staff member. You may struggle to manage an individual who was formerly a peer and close friend. There may be ‘organizational conflict’ between departments or companies. 

As long as conflict is not resolved, organizations and those who work in them will feel the impact. Thomas Crum (1) teaches that by replacing reflexive, unconscious “I win - you lose” reactions to conflict with conscious “you and I” approaches, we can capitalize on conflict to achieve goals and objectives.

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