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Fields & Applications Food, Beverage & Agriculture

Moore’s Law and Crystal Balls

When developing analytical methods to quantify bioactive trace components in foods, I’ve always tried to work at the edge of current methodology. But for some time now, a big question has loomed over me: when can I expect to overcome the limitations of these methods? I set out to provide an answer by predicting when the whole food metabolome will be identifiable and detectable...

First, we separated the unknown components of the food metabolome into three different sets of “dark matter:”

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About the Author

Michael Rychlik

School of Life Sciences, Technical University of Munich, Germany

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