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Fields & Applications Professional Development, Chemical, Mass Spectrometry, Technology, Clinical

Curiosity Applied

As a scientist, you are starved without curiosity – asking a question that other people don’t ask is what makes you a scientist. That’s a bold statement, but it’s based on my experience moving from a lab where we had total creative license (super innovation), to a lab where we had to answer questions quickly, but not necessarily innovatively. The transition was a struggle, until I figured out how to bring the curiosity back into my work.

I got curious about chemistry as an undergrad. The more time I devoted to learning about chemistry, the more I enjoyed it. I could visualize the chemical structures in my head, and I became fascinated about what happens at the molecular level. I was lucky to have a PI who gave me both the opportunity and the trust to run a mass spec instrument by myself as part of a project (once he knew I wouldn’t damage it!).

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