Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Fields & Applications Forensics, Mass Spectrometry

Faster, More Objective Maggot Analysis

Although academically interesting to some, it’s difficult to see the relevance of maggots to the average analytical scientist. For those who work in forensics, though, the link is clear – maggots on a cadaver can help investigators determine when and where death occurred. In some cases, such as neglect, they can even help establish a person’s physical condition prior to death.

The drawback? Maggot analysis is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and requires the input of expert entomologists who can distinguish between different species. In many cases, this requires raising living maggots to their mature fly form to make species distinction easier. But not all cadavers yield live maggots – and, even in those that do, identification can be subjective and different species may resemble one another too closely for reliable classification.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Analytical Scientist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Michael Schubert

While obtaining degrees in biology from the University of Alberta and biochemistry from Penn State College of Medicine, I worked as a freelance science and medical writer. I was able to hone my skills in research, presentation and scientific writing by assembling grants and journal articles, speaking at international conferences, and consulting on topics ranging from medical education to comic book science. As much as I’ve enjoyed designing new bacteria and plausible superheroes, though, I’m more pleased than ever to be at Texere, using my writing and editing skills to create great content for a professional audience.

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register