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Fields & Applications Metabolomics & Lipidomics, Food, Beverage & Agriculture

Foodomics: Work in Progress

Most people are familiar with the adage “you are what you eat.” For the general public, this concept would typically be associated with the various food groups that are used to help promote good eating habits. But none of the foods consumed consist of just a single item. Rather, everything we eat is a complex mixture of thousands of different compounds. Though the initial focus of food research was to understand how the nutrients contained in food contributed to health, over time it has been recognized that even the very minor constituents present in our foods may be capable of affecting our health. As a result, identifying which ones can be used for this purpose has become of great interest.

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About the Author

Peter Zahradka

Zahradka graduated with a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Western Ontario (London, Ontario) and subsequently obtained post-doctoral training at both Stanford University and the University of Guelph before joining the Department of Physiology, University of Manitoba, in 1991. His laboratory is located at the St. Boniface Research Centre. He was a member of the Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and his work on vascular disease identified a novel pharmaceutical compound capable of preventing restenosis. From 2006 to2013 he served as the Director of the Canadian Centre for Agri-Food Research in Health and Medicine (CCARM) and became CCARM Deputy Director in 2016. He also is head (since 2012) of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease, Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology. Dr. Zahradka’s lab is engaged in studying novel bioactive compounds from buckwheat and pulses (lentils/beans) in relation to the management of diabetes, obesity and vascular disease. He has worked closely with Dr. Carla Taylor since 2000 and together they have developed a clinical trial program to validate the results of their animal and cell culture studies and thus translate this research to benefit human health.

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