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Techniques & Tools Spectroscopy

Applying Infrared Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

Infrared spectroscopy and microscopy rapidly analyze materials to create fingerprints that identify chemical species and create spatially resolved maps of chemical composition. Both techniques are used routinely in academic and industrial research settings but infrared microspectroscopy suffers from the limitation that, in practice, the spatial resolution is limited by optical diffraction to around 10-30 μm.

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About the Authors

Curt Marcott

Curtis Marcott

Curt Marcott worked for over 28 years as an infrared spectroscopist at Procter & Gamble after which, he joined the spectroscopic consulting firm Light Light Solutions. in 2007. “Although I was very proud of the role I played in development of IR spectral imaging and its application to industrial problems, P&G managers were always asking me what it would take to look at smaller objects. Now in a ‘retirement’ job, I am really enjoying helping to make that dream a reality.” Curt is also an adjunct professor at the University of Delaware and Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.


Craig Prater

Craig Prater

When I was a child, I was given a large magnifying glass. When I wasn’t trying to set fires with it, I spent a large amount of time looking at things that were too small for my unaided eyes to see,” says Craig Prater. “This passion has continued through my professional life, developing instrumentation to reveal fascinating structures.” Craig joined Anasys as CTO in 2007 to focus on nanoscale materials characterization.

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