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Techniques & Tools Spectroscopy, Chemical, Data Analysis

Gurus of Raman Spectroscopy

The DBA Lowdown

The set of vibrational frequencies of a molecule constitutes its unique fingerprint. Vibrational modes that are “Raman-active” interact with incident laser light in an inelastic scattering process. This results in secondary photons with a frequency shifted from the incident ones by the vibrational frequency. Raman spectroscopy leverages this process to optically measure the vibrational spectrum of a molecule (or a material) and thus reveal its chemical identity.

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About the Authors

Volker Deckert

Volker Deckert holds a joint position at the Institute of Physical Chemistry at the University of Jena, Germany, and the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, also in Jena. He obtained his Diploma and PhD from the University of Würzburg, Germany, working on difference-Raman spectroscopy. As a postdoc at the University of Tokyo and the Kanagawa Academy of Science in Kawasaki, he worked on non-linear and time-resolved laser spectroscopy of photo-induced isomerisation reactions. While at ETH Zurich, he started working on the development of high spatial resolution techniques for Raman spectroscopy, a topic that has followed him to Jena, where, in particular, he explores the possibilities of the technology to investigate structural changes of bio-related compounds with nanometer resolution.


Duncan Graham

Head of Department for Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.

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