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Techniques & Tools Technology, Spectroscopy, Microscopy

The Emergence of Quantitative Raman

From its origin in a focused beam of sunlight in the Indian city of Kolkata, Raman spectroscopy has come a long way over the last 80 years. Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman discovered that when light passes through a transparent material, some of the deflected light changes in wavelength because of inelastic scattering of photons – a phenomenon known as the Raman effect. The finding earned him the 1930 Nobel Prize in physics and has, for the most part, met the original objectives set out by Raman.

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About the Author

Debdulal Roy

Debdulal Roy is a researcher at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), UK. Deb obtained a BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kharagpur, India, prior to getting his PhD degree as a Nehru Scholar from the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, UK. “I worked on a thesis entitled “Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon Nanostructures”, after which I spent two years at the Nanoscience Centre, University of Cambridge in Mark Welland's lab before joining NPL as a Strategic Research Fellow in 2005,” says Deb, “During this period I worked on developing a tip-enhanced Raman spectrometer in reflection mode.” Deb collaborates with a number of research groups in universities including University of Cambridge, University of Bristol, CNRS-Orleans and King's College London on various topics in scanning probe microscopy and analysis of nanostructures. Deb now leads the research area on Analytical Nanoprobes at NPL.

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