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Fields & Applications Mass Spectrometry, Metabolomics & Lipidomics, Clinical, Proteomics, Genomics & DNA Analysis

The ‘One Pot’ Approach

When people select one technology over another it’s usually because they “grew up with it”, which is either dependent on where they did their PhD work, or which kind of -omics they happened to apply first to their area of biology. So many molecules are detected with -omics technologies that the false positive rate is likely higher than we expect given today’s tools and metrics. When basing subsequent hypotheses and publishing results on single-omic studies, there is bound to be misinformation put forth. Being able to perform additional -omics experiments will help constrain that to some extent. For example, if someone performs a transcriptomic study and has complementary proteomic data (or other -omics data), they will be able to check if what they thought might be going on at the transcript level had propagated through to the protein or the metabolite level.

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About the Author

Tom Metz

Tom Metz is Integrative Omics Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Washington, USA. His research has focused on the development of both global and targeted metabolomics and lipidomics capabilities based on LC and gas chromatography (GC) coupled with mass spectrometry, both for fundamental studies of metabolism/metabolic interactions as well as for biomarker discovery.

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