Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Techniques & Tools Metabolomics & Lipidomics, Liquid Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry

Gurus of the monolith

Nobuo Tanaka

tanaka

Nobuo Tanaka was educated at Kyoto University in Japan. After graduation, he spent several years as a postdoctoral researcher at University of Pennsylvania, University of Washington in Seattle, and finally Northeastern University in Boston. He returned to Japan in 1979 and worked his way up to full professor at Kyoto Institute of Technology where he was active for 30 years until his retirement in 2009. Since then, he has been a technical advisor at GL Sciences. Tanaka’s most important contribution was the development and reduction to practice of monolithic silica columns for HPLC. Now, he contributes to the development of high-speed, high-efficiency monolithic silica columns and the operation methods that can enhance the performance of HPLC.

Frantisek Svec

Frantisek Svec

Frantisek Svec is currently professor at Beijing University of Chemical Technology and PI in the International Centre for Soft Matter there. He worked for the Academy of Sciences in Prague for several years before he joined faculty first at Cornell University, and then at the University of California-Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Svec received numerous honours for his world-leading contribution to chromatographic science, including the ACS Award in Chromatography and the Martin Medal, and is recognized for his extraordinary work in developing polymeric stationary phases and their adaption to multiple column and chip formats. His pioneering developments have been adopted widely by numerous commercial organisations. Svec is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Separation Science and is a member of the editorial boards for several leading chromatographic journals.

Emily Hilder

Emily Hilder

Emily Hilder is a graduate of the University of Tasmania, awarded her BSc(hons) in 1997 and PhD in 2001. She held postdoctoral positions at Johannes Kepler University (Austria) and the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley (USA). In 2004 she joined the Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science (ACROSS) at the University of Tasmania where she held an ARC Australian Postdoctoral Fellowship from 2004-2007 and ARC Future Fellowship from 2010-2014 and was promoted to full Professor in 2011. She is currently Head of Chemistry and Director of the ARC Training Centre for Portable Analytical Separation Technologies (ASTech) at the University of Tasmania. Her research focuses on the design and application of new polymeric materials to improve analytical separations and on approaches to make analytical systems smaller and more portable. She is an Editor of the Journal of Separation Science and a member of the Editorial Board for a number of other journals.

Sebastiaan Eeltink

Sebastiaan Eeltink

Sebastiaan Eeltink received his PhD degree in chemistry (specializing in analytical chemistry) in 2005 from the University of Amsterdam. Thereafter, he conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley, USA, and was guest scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In 2007, he joined Dionex and conducted research on packed and monolith column technology for ultra-high-pressure LC, two-dimensional LC, and nanoLC. Eeltink is now research professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Free University of Brussels, where he focuses on the development, characterization, and application of novel chromatography materials, including nano-structured monolithic materials and coatings in capillaries and micro-fluidic devices, for ultra-high-pressure and multi-dimensional (spatial) LC-MS separations.

 

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Analytical Scientist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Authors

Picture of Author Emily Hilder

Emily Hilder

Emily Hilder is Professor and ARC Future Fellow in the Australian Centre for Research on Separation Science (ACROSS) and School of Chemistry at the University of Tasmania. Her research focuses on the design and application of new polymeric materials, in particular polymer monoliths, in all areas of separation science. She is also interested in the development of miniaturised analytical systems, particularly for applications in clinical diagnostics and remote monitoring. She has over 95 peer-reviewed publications and was recently recognised as the LCGC Emerging Leader in Chromatography (2012). She is also an Editor of the Journal of Separation Science.


Sebastiaan Eeltink

Sebastiaan Eeltink

Sebastiaan Eeltink received his PhD degree in chemistry (specializing in analytical chemistry) in 2005 from the University of Amsterdam. Thereafter, he conducted postdoctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley, USA, and was guest scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In 2007, he joined Dionex and conducted research on packed and monolith column technology for ultra-high-pressure LC, twodimensional LC, and nanoLC. Eeltink is now research professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering at the Free University of Brussels, where he focuses on the development, characterization, and application of novel chromatography materials, including nano-structured monolithic materials and coatings in capillaries and micro-fluidic devices, for ultra-high-pressure and multidimensional (spatial) LC-MS separations.


Frantisek Svec

Frantisek Svec lives in California and is Professor at the Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Soft Matter Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, China and at the Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Charles University, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. He received a BSc in chemistry and PhD in polymer chemistry from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic). In 1976 he joined the Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, before joining the faculty at Cornell University in 1992. In 1997, he was appointed at the University of California, Berkeley and also affiliated with the Molecular Foundry of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Svec has authored 450 scientific publications, edited two books, and authored 75 patents. He is editor-in-chief of the Journal of Separation Science, member of editorial boards of a number of renowned journals and was President of CASSS in 2003–2015. He is best known for his research in the area of monoliths and their use in liquid chromatography, electrochromatography, supports for solid phase chemistry, enzyme immobilization, and microfluidics.


Nobuo Tanaka

Nobuo Tanaka

Nobuo Tanaka was educated at Kyoto University in Japan. After graduation, he spent several years as a postdoctoral researcher at University of Pennsylvania, University of Washington in Seattle, and finally Northeastern University in Boston. He returned to Japan in 1979 and worked his way up to full professor at Kyoto Institute of Technology where he was active for 30 years until his retirement in 2009. Since then, he has been a technical advisor at GL Sciences. Tanaka’s most important contribution was the development and reduction to practice of monolithic silica columns for HPLC. Now, he contributes to the development of high-speed, highefficiency monolithic silica columns and the operation methods that can enhance the performance of HPLC.

Newsletter

Send me the latest from The Analytical Scientist.

Sign up now

Most Popular

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register