Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Techniques & Tools Gas Chromatography, Liquid Chromatography, Mass Spectrometry, Technology

The Heat Is On

The countdown is on for the 42nd ISCC and 15th GC×GC Symposium, taking place May 13-18 on the spectacular lakeshore of Riva del Garda, Italy. Separation scientists from around the world will exchange ideas through workshops, discussion sessions, and an exhibition displaying a wealth of instrumental innovations. Sessions will mirror the key trends within the separation science community – and this year comprehensive two-dimensional techniques will take center stage. Comprehensive chromatography is also the star of this issue of The Analytical Scientist, with a fascinating panel discussion between three gurus of the field, a technology update from a panel of top instrument vendors, and an interview with “comprehensive collaborator” Hans-Gerd Janssen.

Comprehensive two-dimensional techniques are becoming increasingly established, and are likely to experience more growth in the near future, as regulations in various fields demand deeper and more precise analysis. Commercially available GC×GC and LC×LC systems are already a huge step forward compared with the first prototypes. However, their superior performance still comes with increased complexity, and this has made the migration of 2D techniques into industrial workflows challenging.

Comparing the two multidimensional giants side by side, it is striking how much more mature GC×GC is. Indeed, we are already witnessing the evolution of the technique towards ultrafast 3D separations, as will be illustrated at RIVA by exciting presentations on partial modulation via a pulsed-flow valve (Robert Synovec) and fine tuning of soft electron ionization conditions (Peter Tranchida).

Development of LC×LC – perceived to be trickier to master – has been much slower. However, the immense potential impact of this technique has recently spurred exciting evolutions. Prominent scientists will discuss exciting new opportunities, such as integration with triple quadrupole MS to make target analyte quantification more robust (Paola Dugo), using a flat-bed stationary phase in a “spatial” mode (Peter Schoenmakers), or exploiting a single dual-mechanism polar column in the first dimension (Pavel Jandera). We are even seeing combinations like LC×LC with ion-mobility separation and Q-TOF MS (André de Villiers) – what we would call a five-dimensional separation.

The large number of participants already registered for Riva’s first-ever LC×LC short course demonstrates how much enthusiasm is being generated by the ability of today’s technology to create tailored multi-separation platforms. I hope the articles within will provide you a clear overview of this exciting technology – and for a more “comprehensive” discussion, I hope to see you in Riva del Garda!

Luigi Mondello

Guest Editor

Enjoy our FREE content!

Log in or register to gain full unlimited access to all content on the The Analytical Scientist site. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Luigi Mondello

Luigi Mondello is Full professor of Analytical Chemistry in the Chemical, Biological, Pharmaceutical, Environmental Sciences Department, University of Messina, Italy.

Newsletter

Send me the latest from The Analytical Scientist.

Sign up now

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register