Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Techniques & Tools Mass Spectrometry, Liquid Chromatography

The Road to HPLC2018 Part III: Catching the Next Wave in IMS

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) originated more than a century ago and, to date, has been mainly used for chemical weapon agent detection and airport passenger screening. Though the field has been developing steadily over the years, IMS is only now transitioning to the top tier of analytical separation methods.

In IMS, ions collide with a buffer gas and separate due to their different shape-dependent velocities in an electric field. In high vacuum, without collisions with gas molecules, the result would be a separation based upon the ion’s mass and charge – in other words, mass spectrometry (MS). On the other hand, if the IMS separation were to occur in a liquid (and in the presence of oppositely charged ions) it would be electrophoresis. Since ions attain much higher velocities in gases than in liquids, IMS separations occur much faster than liquid-based separations, with some forms achieving useful separations in milliseconds for compounds that might take minutes to an hour to effectively separate by HPLC.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Analytical Scientist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Richard Smith

Richard D. Smith is Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist, Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, Washington, USA.

Newsletter

Send me the latest from The Analytical Scientist.

Sign up now

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register