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Fields & Applications Genomics & DNA Analysis, Mass Spectrometry, Capillary Electrophoresis, Chemical, Microscopy

Small Wonder

Chemical interactions can drive cell function. Because of the striking chemical heterogeneity found within cell populations, analyzing cells individually can uncover mechanisms not observable when studying the chemistry from homogenized cellular populations. However, the intricacies of single cell investigation become more overwhelming the more we consider them; from sample preparation to analysis, smaller scales increase our risk of failure.

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About the Authors

Marina Philip

Marina C. Philip is a graduate student pursuing a PhD in chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, USA.


Jonathan Sweedler

Jonathan Sweedler is based in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the James R. Eiszner Family Endowed Chair in Chemistry and a Center for Advanced Study Professor of Chemistry, and serves as the Director of the School of Chemical Sciences.
Professor Sweedler received his BS degree in Chemistry from the University of California at Davis in 1983, and his PhD from the University of Arizona in 1989. Thereafter, he was an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University before joining the faculty at Illinois in 1991. His research interests are in bioanalytical chemistry, and focus on developing new methods for assaying the chemistry occurring in nanoliter-volume samples, and applying these analytical methods to characterize the molecular forms, distribution, and dynamic release of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides from a range of animal models. Professor Sweedler is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Analytical Chemistry.
University of Illinois Affiliations: Department of Chemistry, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Carl R. Woese Institute of Genomic Biology, Department of Bioengineering, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, and the Neuroscience Program.

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