Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Techniques & Tools Liquid Chromatography

The Analytical Triumvirate

The development of analytical techniques is dependent on the interest and investment of three possible contributors: i) manufacturers who build innovative systems and promote them; ii) academic researchers who stimulate innovation, improve understanding of the fundamentals, demonstrate feasibility of applications and educate future users; and iii) industry users who demand technology improvements in setting high requirements on system quality, reliability, robustness and cost-effectiveness.

When one of these three elements of the triumvirate is missing, analytical methods do not progress well. For an example of such impaired development we need only look at the history of supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC).

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Analytical Scientist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Caroline West

Caroline West, now an associate professor in analytical chemistry, ICOA, University of Orléans, France, only heard derisive comments when she first start working with supercritical fluid chromatography: “Why the hell are you wasting your time with this non-existent technique?” Now, the tide has turned. West discovered SFC when she was only a “baby” analytical chemist, so she can no longer live without it. “Unravelling its surprising phenomena and projecting the quasi-unlimited possibilities of this separation method is keeping my neurons 150% busy. I’ve no time to fall into the boredom of using long and fastidious methods with unsatisfactory resolution.”

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register