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Fields & Applications Liquid Chromatography, Pharma & Biopharma, Mass Spectrometry, Proteomics

Pushing the Limits of Liquid Chromatography

Expanding LC Boundaries

We must inspire creative minds to keep LC moving forward

By Mary J. Wirth, W. Brooks Fortune Distinguished Professor, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA.

Today, the pharmaceutical industry is a major user of liquid chromatography (LC), where stainless steel columns offer reproducibility and sensitive UV detection. The best commercially available LC columns for small-molecule separations now give about 50 percent more plates and faster separation times compared to 20 years ago. Even such a small improvement in resolution gained through the higher plate numbers is valuable for analysis of impurities and degradation products in pharmaceuticals – and the higher speed allows for faster methods development. Notably, separation speed has improved more than resolution.

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About the Author

Picture of Author Mary Wirth

Mary Wirth

<span lang="EN-US">Mary Wirth is the W. Brooks Fortune Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Purdue University.&nbsp; </span>She researches new materials for protein separations, including characterizing heterogeneity of protein drugs, improving top-down proteomics, and discovering trace protein biomarkers for screening of early aggressive cancer.&nbsp; Mary received her BS degree in 1974 from Northern Illinois University and her PhD in 1978 from Purdue University.&nbsp; She is a Fellow of the Society of Applied Spectroscopy, and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Her research has been recognized by awards that include the ACS Analytical Division Award in Spectrochemical Analysis, the EAS Gold Medal Award in spectroscopy, the ANACHEM Award, the Eastern Analytical Symposium Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry, the Dal Nogare Award from the Chromatography Forum of the Delaware Valley, and the Jubilee Medal from the Chromatography Society.&nbsp;

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