Cookies

Like most websites The Analytical Scientist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.

Andrew deMello

The Power List 2017


Andrew deMello

Professor of Biochemical Engineering, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences ETH Zürich, Switzerland.

Proudest moment
I have been very fortunate to be involved in a number of exciting discoveries and inventions during my career. In each and every one, success was primarily due to the talent and creativity of the students and postdocs leading the experimental work. Unsurprisingly, I am most proud of their accomplishments and successes in their subsequent careers.

Most successful collaboration
New technologies are only as good as the problems that they solve, and our collaborations with end users (whether chemists, biologists or medics) have almost always proved the most fulfilling and successful. For example, our recent collaborations with Maksym Kovalenko’s group at ETH Zurich have allowed us to create a new suite of microfluidic tools to design and build bespoke functional materials – something we could never have imagined or achieved alone.

My hero of nano
At the start of my career, visionary work by Andreas Manz opened my eyes to the potential of chip-based microfluidics in chemistry and biology. Subsequently, our interest in using droplets as experimental tools was catalyzed by pioneering studies from Rustem Ismaglov’s group at Chicago.

Nominator comment: “deMello is a world leader in microfluidic technology, who has made many seminal contributions to the field, including important advances in synthetic processing, droplet-based microfluidics, ultra-high sensitivity detection in small volumes and systems for point-of-care diagnostics. Of particular relevance is his work in the microfluidic synthesis of nanoparticles – an approach that he and his coworkers pioneered in 2002, and which has transformed the practice of nanocrystal synthesis.”


Part of the Power List 2017

The Magnificent Tens

The Magnificent Tens
After 2016’s celebration of women in analytical science, we return to the Top 100 for 2017.
But there’s a twist. This summer, we asked you to nominate scientists in ten categories – from the stars of separation science, to omics explorers, to the mentors training the next generation.

Go to The Power List 2017

Register to The Analytical Scientist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Analytical Scientist magazine

Register