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Spectroscopy

Fields & Applications Pharma & Biopharma

Closer to the Boundary

Work in Gwangju has brought medicine one step closer to effective membrane-permeable drugs

Fields & Applications Spectroscopy

Breath Analysis with a (Very) Fine Toothed Comb

| James Strachan

Mid-infrared cavity-enhanced direct-frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) simultaneously detects and monitors four health biomarkers in breath

Fields & Applications Spectroscopy

Confessions of the Last French Queen

| Lauren Robertson

XRF spectroscopy reveals the truth behind Marie-Antoinette’s secret correspondence with her Swedish lover

Techniques & Tools Pharma & Biopharma

Raman Spectroscopy Predicts Immunotherapy Response

| James Strachan

Immunotherapy unmasked: Raman spectroscopy combined with machine learning predicts non-responders to immunotherapy

Fields & Applications Metabolomics & Lipidomics

Crème de la Analytical Chem

Showcasing some of our most popular articles over the years

Techniques & Tools Microscopy

Admiring the Cellular Landscape

A stunning 3D rendering of a eukaryotic cell, made from X-ray, nuclear magnetic resonance, and cryo-electron microscopy datasets

Techniques & Tools Mass Spectrometry

Not To Be Missed: IMS-MS

| Kevin Giles

Kevin Giles explores the wonderful world of IMS-MS, and Waters’ key contributions to it

Fields & Applications Spectroscopy

C. difficile, But Not Impossible

| Lauren Robertson

Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy could be the key to a fast and accurate clinical test for C. difficile infection in hospitals

Fields & Applications Spectroscopy

Talking Photonics

| Sponsored by Hamamatsu

In “Analytical Talks,” experts from Hamamatsu Photonics take us on an exciting video tour of the diverse world of optoelectronics

Techniques & Tools Spectroscopy

Positively Medieval

| James Strachan

Portable X-ray fluorescence suggests a group of windows from Canterbury Cathedral may be the oldest stained glass windows in England

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